Aktualizacja: 30.kwietnia'2022
  




Grecja
Przewodnik z cyklu PLUS





Blisko 61% powierzchni Grecji zajmują pasma górskie (śr. wysokość 1200-1800 m n.p.m.), które przyjmują przebieg południkowy. Obszary nizinne są niewielkie i występują w pobliżu wybrzeży (Nizina Salonicka, Tracka, Tesalska oraz Argolidzka). Półwysep Chalcydycki, tworzy 3 wtórne półwyspy: Athos, Longos i Kasandra.

Grecy mają ponad 3000 wysp. Z czego niewiele ponad 100 jest zamieszkałych. Trzy największe wyspy to Kreta, Evia i Lesvos. Odwiedzilismy na razie dwie z nich, ale wszystko przed nami :)

Kraj Fety i oliwek
Kraj uroczych, otwartych i pomocnych ludzi. Kraj, który jest, oczywiście jak na bałkańskie warunki, wyjątkowo czysty. I wyjątkowo bezpieczny. Naszym celem była "kolebka greckiej cywilizacji", a jak mówią sami mieszkańcy "kwintesencja greckości"- Peloponez. I wyśniony przeze mnie masyw Olimpu.




na liście UNESCO:
>>> więcej na whc.unesco.org [EN]

Late Medieval Bastioned Fortifications in Greece
Unesco tentative list

With the appearance and establishment, in the 15th century, of the use of gunpowder, a new, powerful and destructive means of warfare, city fortification practices changed. Since medieval fortifications were unable to withstand the constantly increasing artillery power, additional defensive structures began to be added to existing fortresses. This change was completed in the 16th century, establishing the “bastion system” or “fronte bastionato”, based on the principle of “flanking fire”. In the 17th century, the need to confront even greater artillery firepower led to the construction of a multitude of smaller fortifications outside the main moat, whose aim was to keep the enemy as far away as possible from the main fortifications. Finally, up to the end of the 18th century, fortification architecture would continue to be based on the principles of the 16th century, while of course following the development of artillery. This development is documented by a series of fortifications on Greek territory. These fortifications are mostly found in areas that passed into Latin hands, such as the Peloponnese, the coasts of Western Greece, the Ionian Islands, Crete and the Dodecanese. Most were built on the site of older, ancient and/or Byzantine fortifications, but their main phase was constructed during the various phases of Latin domination. These are particularly well-preserved fortification works, which largely retain their integrity and original layout intact to the present day. This is very significant, given that they were built by the leading engineers of the time and closely follow developments in the field of defensive art. In recent years restoration projects for their protection and enhancement have taken place preserving however their particular character and their relation to the surrounding area. The fortifications also contribute to the study of the urban areas of which they form a part, providing valuable information on the organisation of urban planning, which they determined in several cases. The proposed fortifications are strategically positioned on the hubs of the trade routes between West and East and also North and South, and therefore played an important part as trading stations in the East Mediterranean basin.




Teatry starogreckie
Unesco tentative list



Teatry greckie na liście UNESCO



Starogrecki typ amfiteatru, służący wystawianiu sztuk widowiskowych. Składał się z widowni umieszczonej na stoku naturalnego wzniesienia i orchestry, z czasem schemat wzbogacono o proskenion (odpowiednik dzisiejszej sceny) i zaplecze dla aktorów (skene), a potem o kolejne elementy. Jako wzorzec dla budowli tego typu posłużył ateński teatr Dionizosa. Rozwój greckich budowli teatralnych można rozpatrywać w podziale na okres klasyczny, hellenistyczny i grecko-rzymski. Teatr grecki stał się wzorem dla budowanych w okresie późniejszym teatrów rzymskich..



Ancient Towers of the Aegean Sea
Unesco tentative list

The numerous ancient towers scattered across many Aegean islands (Amorgos, Andros, Thasos, Ikaria, Kea, Kythnos, Mykonos, Naxos, Serifos, Sifnos, Skiathos, Paros, Tinos, etc.) and the mainland, constitute a particular type of ancient building with various uses. The vast majority of the towers are dated to around the mid-4th c. BC and up to the first quarter of the 3rd c. BC. Despite their numbers and dispersal, they present common architectural features, such as their circular, square or rectangular plan and their sturdy construction of local stone. The towers were built in non-urban areas, in order to serve a wide range of needs depending on circumstances and location. The main motive for their construction was defence in the wider sense, i.e. the protection of people, animals and goods. The towers sometimes formed part of a wider system of defences and refuges, while others functioned as watchtowers and lighthouses. They are also often found in areas where mining activities are attested. One notable use of towers is as points in an early communication system consisting of networks of beacons (fryktoriai), for the transmission of light signals between towers in direct line of sight, in some cases covering extremely wide geographical areas. Sometimes the towers formed the main building of farmhouses owned by wealthy citizens. Towers of later date in the Cyclades, built to serve similar needs, are almost identical parallels to these. A multitude of ancient towers, dominating the characteristic island landscape, are preserved in the Aegean. Many preserve their integrity to a striking degree, while a major project for their restoration and promotion has been undertaken in recent years.
>więcej na whc.unesco.org [EN]

Grecja kontynentalna:

Trzeba pamiętać, że najlepszym sposobem na obrażenie Greka z północy jest... poinformowanie go, że przyjeżdża się z Macedonii. Dla Greków Państwo Macedonia nie istnieje pod tą nazwą. (I tu historia przyznaje im rację). Nazywają je FYROM (Former Yougoslavian Republic of Macedonia), a Macedonia jest grecka i już !

Tracja
historycznie: starożytna kraina położona między dolnym Dunajem, Morzem Czarnym, Morzem Egejskim i rzeką Strymon. Obecnie region geograficzny w granicach Bułgarii, Grecji i Turcji, znajdujący się m.in. na terenie Niziny Trackiej. Ze względu na skupisko ludności muzułmańskiej i kulturalne związki z Bułgarią i Turcją, ma zupełnie inny charakter niż pozostała część Grecji kontynentalnej.

National Park of Dadia - Lefkimi - Souflion

Unesco tentative list

Situated at the southeast end of the Rhodope mountain range, at the crossroads of two continents, the National Park of Dadia-Lefkimi-Soufli Forest (DNP) is of exceptional ecological significance at European level. Characterised by a rich habitat mosaic on a network of low hills in a transitional climate zone between the Mediterranean and the continental, the DNP extends over an area of 42,800ha in Evros Prefecture. It is located at the easternmost edge of a huge forested area that extends all the way west and north along the Rhodope mountain range, while major forested areas are absent for hundreds of kilometres eastwards. Pine trees predominate in the area of the National Park, forming coniferous forests of Pinus brutia, with P. nigra found at the lowest altitudes of its known distribution, while mixed and deciduous forests also occur over a large expanse. Geologically, the northern part of the DNP is dominated by Tertiary ophiolith complexes, while the south mainly consists of Paleogene volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The location of the DNP, on one of the most important migration routes for birds of the Western Palearctic, makes this forest one of the few regions in Europe cohabitated by 36 out of the 38 European raptor species, where three of the four European species of vulture (Aegypius monachus, Neophron percnopterus and Gyps fulvus) co-exist. The resident Black Vulture population in particular is of great importance, as it is the last remnant of an initially large population of the species within the Balkan region, while the presence of the endangered Egyptian vulture is also significant.

Macedonia Wschodnia


Z notatnika krajoznawcy


źródło: Wikipedia

jeden z 13 regionów administracyjnych w Grecji (administracja wspólna z Tracją) położony w północno-wschodniej części kraju. Obejmuje swoim obszarem fragment greckiej Macedonii oraz tę część Tracji, która należy do Grecji. Region graniczy od zachodu z regionem Macedonia Środkowa, od północy z Bułgarią, od wschodu z Turcją. Od południa ograniczony jest przez Morze Egejskie.

Archaeological Site of Philippi (2016)

The remains of this walled city lie at the foot of an acropolis in north-eastern Greece, on the ancient route linking Europe and Asia, the Via Egnatia. Founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II, the city developed as a “small Rome” with the establishment of the Roman Empire in the decades following the Battle of Philippi, in 42 BCE. The vibrant Hellenistic city of Philip II, of which the walls and their gates, the theatre and the funerary heroon (temple) are to be seen, was supplemented with Roman public buildings such as the Forum and a monumental terrace with temples to its north. Later the city became a centre of the Christian faith following the visit of the Apostle Paul in 49-50 CE. The remains of its basilicas constitute an exceptional testimony to the early establishment of Christianity.




Z notatnika krajoznawcy







źródło: Wikipedia

MACEDONIA ŚRODKOWA:
Macedonia jest największym regionem Grecji (licząc zachodnią, wschodnią i środkową), tu znajdują się Saloniki - drugie co do wielkości miasto kraju.

Zabytki wczesnochrześcijańskie i bizantyjskie w Salonikach (K I, II, IV / 1988)

Saloniki, założone w r. 315 p.n.e., stolica prowincji rzymskiej i miasto portowe, było jednym z pierwszych ośrodków rozprzestrzeniania się chrześcijaństwa. Spośród zabytków tego okresu należy wyróżnić kościoły na planie centralnym, bazylikowym lub łączącym cechy ich obu, powstałe pomiędzy IV i XV w., stanowiące diachroniczną serię typologiczną, która miała znaczny wpływ w świecie bizantyjskim. Mozaiki rotundy (przebudowanej na kościół Św. Jerzego), kościołów Św. Demetriusza i Św. Dawida należą do arcydzieł sztuki wczesnochrześcijańskiej.


Góra Athos (N III / K I, II, IV, V, VI / 1988)

Od 1054 “Święta Góra", bez prawa wstępu dla kobiet i dzieci, stanowi środek duchowy prawosławia, a od czasów bizantyjskich posiada statut autonomiczny. Jest to również ważny ośrodek artystyczny. Wzorcowy plan klasztorów (obecnie, w około dwudziestu klasztorach żyje 1400 mnichów) rozprzestrzenił się aż po Rosję, zaś tamtejsza szkoła malarska odcisnęła piętno na historii sztuki prawosławnej.


Stanowiska archeologiczne w Verginie (K I, III / 1996)

Dawna Aigai, pierwsza stolica królestwa Macedonii, została odkryta w XIX w. w pobliżu Verginy, w północnej Grecji. Do najstarszych zabytków należą ruiny monumentalnego pałacu o bogatej dekoracji mozaikowej i polichromowanych stiukach oraz nekropola, na której znajduje się przeszło trzysta kopców grobowych, niektóre pochodzące z XI w. Jeden z grobów królewskich Wielkiego Kopca został zidentyfikowany jako grobowiec Filipa II, władcy, który podbił wszystkie miasta-państwa greckie, torując drogę swemu synowi Aleksandrowi oraz ekspansji świata hellenistycznego.



Macedonia Zachodnia






źródło: Wikipedia

The Area of the Prespes Lakes: Megali and Mikri Prespa which includes Byzantine and post-Byzantine monuments
Unesco tentative list

The Prespa National Park (PNP) is situated in Northwest Greece, in the Region of West Macedonia; it covers an area of 327km2 and is part of the Transboundary Prespa Park, which is shared between Greece, Albania and FYROM. The PNP consists of the lakes, Megali and Mikri Prespa, and the lake basin which extends to the tops of the surrounding mountains. The two lakes are separated by a narrow isthmus called “Koula”. Mikri Prespa has a maximum depth of 8.4 m and covers an area of 47.7 km2, of which 43.5 km2 belong to Greece and 3.9 km2 to Albania. Megali Prespa is 55m deep and covers an area of 259.4 km2 which is divided between Greece, Albania and FYROM. The PNP has approximately 1,500 inhabitants. The region of Prespa preserves various monuments and many remains of settlements created through the long-term human presence in the area. The archaeological data show that people have lived in the Prespa valley for over four thousand years, but documented human presence does not emerge until the 2nd century BC. Inscriptions found on the island of Agios Achilleios, dated to the Hellenistic era, refer to Julius Crispus and the independent city of Lyca. In Classical times the Prespa region formed part of ancient Lyncus, and the lakes were called Little and Great Brygeis. In 148 BC Prespa became part of the Roman Province of Upper Macedonia. In the Early Christian period it belonged to Macedonia Deutera as a part of Illyricum Prefecture. In the late 8th and early 9th century AD the region belonged to the Theme of Thessaloniki. In the 10th century, Agios Achilleios became the first seat of Czar Samuel Comitopoulos’ government. He founded the basilica of Agios Achilleios, in which he placed the relics of Saint Achilleios. In 1018 the Byzantine Emperor Basil II reconquered the territory, built two fortresses, Vasilida and Konstantion, and established the seat of the Archbishop of Ohrid. In 1072 the Alamani and Franks passed through Prespa and ravaged the church of St Achilleios. In the 12th century Prespa was referred to as Province of Prespes in the chrysobull of Alexios III Angelus. For a while, the region of Prespa remained under the control of the Despot of Epirus, Michael II Angelus, before passing into the rule of the Emperor of Nicaea, Michael VIII Palaeologus. During the 14th century Prespa was incorporated into the kingdom of Stephen Dusan and was conquered in circa 1386 by the Ottomans. The region remained under their rule for 526 years.


Tesalia
Tesalia to w większości niziny (Nizina Tesalska), które otaczają masywy górskie takie jak: Olimp, Pindos, Othris, Ossa i Pelion.

Meteora (N III / K I, II, IV, V / 1988)

W regionie prawie niedostępnych, granitowych szczytów, pierwsi eremici zamieszkali na “podniebnych kolumnach" już w XI w. W XV w., w okresie odnowy ideału pustelniczego, za cenę ogromnego wysiłku zbudowano tam dwadzieścia cztery klasztory. Ich XVI- wieczne freski stanowią istotny etap w rozwoju malarstwa postbizantyjskiego.

The broader region of Mount Olympus
Unesco tentative list

Olympus, the highest mountain in Greece (the highest peak is 2,918 m. above sea level), rises on the border of Macedonia and Thessaly, between the provinces of Pieria and Larissa. Owing to its specific microclimate, which is partly due to the short distance from the sea and the steep increase in height above sea level, it stands out for its great diversity in terrain, climate and vegetation.

The shape of the massif and the majestic peaks, covered in fog and low-hanging clouds, which often bring storms, in conjunction with its diverse and changeable natural beauty, have always induced awe and admiration. In this eerie landscape, the ancient Greeks placed the residence of the Twelve Gods of Olympus (with Zeus at their head), the Muses and the Graces. There, according to Hesiod, Zeus fought Cronus and the Titans and, after winning, settled there and became lord all the gods, demigods and humans. The myths and traditions collected by Homer and Hesiod were passed on throughout the ancient Greek and Roman world, making Olympus the epicentre of ancient Greek mythology and a symbol of Greek civilization.

According to ancient Greek tradition, the twelve gods lived in the gorges – or ‘folds of Olympus’ as Homer calls them – where their Pałaces were situated. On the highest peak was the throne of Zeus.


Epir
Epir to kraina górzysta, zajmująca obszar północno-zachodniej części Grecji, przy granicy z Albanią. Od zachodu oblewana jest przez wody Morza Jońskiego. Graniczy z Tesalią, Macedonią Zachodnią, Grecją Zachodnią, Grecją Środkową.

Unesco tentative list

Zagori (“the place behind the mountains”, from the Slavic za “behind” and gora “mountain”) constitutes a distinctive geographic and cultural unit of great architectural and environmental interest. Its own inhabitants divide it, based on the natural boundaries traced by the local rivers, into four subunits: Vlachozagoro, Lakka Zagoriou (the villages in the Zagoritikos river valley), the Villages of the Ano Vikos Valley and the Villages of the Voidomatis Valley. These four subunits form a single territorial unit, Zagori. Its first settlements, its oldest core, lie in the west part of present-day Zagori (Papigo and Pedina). The two other parts developed later. Most of the modern villages were established during the Ottoman period, while most of the villages of East Zagori were founded in the 15th century.


Archaeological site of Nikopolis
Unesco tentative list

The city, with the fortification walls and the cemeteries, occupies a fertile strip of land between the Ionian Sea to the west and the Ambracian Gulf to the east, where two of the three city harbours were located. The third harbour ran along both sides of the inlet known as Ormos Vathy at the north edge of the modern city of Preveza. The city occupies an area of approximately 375 acres. The plan of the city was the rectangular grid with the Decumanus (the main east-west street) and the Cardo (main north-south street) intersecting at its centre. Nikopolis was planned within walls with four main gates at the compass points. The southern quarters of the city were mainly composed of residential houses but also included the Odeion, while the northern section saw the construction of the Monument of Augustus, the Theatre, the Gymnasium and the Stadium. This area, known to ancient writers as the “Suburb”, is located outside the Roman fortification walls, on the hills, with a magnificent view of the Ionian sea and the Preveza peninsula. The city had a very effective water-supply system. An impressive 50-km-long aqueduct, consisting of a series of arches (arcade) and tunnels, carried water from the Louros springs to the Nymphaeum, from where it was distributed within the city.




GRECJA Środkowa:
Obejmuje swoim obszarem krainę historyczną Grecja Środkowa z wyłączeniem jej zachodniej części. Do regionu przynależy również duża wyspa Eubea u jego wschodnich wybrzeży. Region graniczy od południowego wschodu z regionem Attyka, od północy z regionem Tesalia, od zachodu z Grecją Zachodnią. Od południa ograniczony jest Zatoką Koryncką, od wschodu Morzem Egejskim. Stolicą regionu jest Lamia.

Stanowisko archeologiczne w Delfach (K I, II, III, IV, VI / 1987)

Sanktuarium panhelleńskie w Delfach, gdzie przemawiała wyrocznia Apollina, mieściło Omfalós, “pępek świata". Przesiąknięte uświęconymi treściami, harmonijnie wtopione we wspaniały krajobraz, w V w. p.n.e. stanowiło prawdziwe centrum i symbol jedności Grecji.


Osios Loukas w Beocji (Fokida koło Delf)
[w:] Klasztory Dafni w Attyce, Osios Loukas w Beocji i Nea Moni na Chios (K I, IV / 1990)

Trzy oddalone od siebie geograficznie klasztory- pierwszy w Attyce, koło Aten, drugi w Fokidzie, w okolicach Delf, a trzeci na jednej z wysp Morza Egejskiego, w pobliżu Azji Mniejszej- należą do tej samej serii typologicznej i posiadają podobne cechy estetyczne. Zbudowane są na planie centralnym i przekryte wielką kopułą wspartą na narożnych trompach, umożliwiających przejście do planu ośmiobocznego. W XI i XII w. zostały ozdobione wspaniałą dekoracją z marmuru oraz pięknymi mozaikami na złotym tle, charakterystycznymi dla “drugiego renesansu bizantyjskiego".




źródło: Wikipedia
jeden z 13 regionów administracyjnych Grecji położony na Półwyspie Attyckim i w dużej części na terenie historycznej krainy Attyka. Oprócz tradycyjnych obszarów do współczesnego regionu administracyjnego Attyka włączona jest też północna część Półwyspu Argolidzkiego oraz wyspa Kythira. Region zajmuje obszar około 3800 km2 i graniczy z regionem Grecja Środkowa i regionem Peloponez.

Oglądane z pewnego dystansu – zarówno z powietrza jak i z morza – wydają się być współcześnie monolityczną, pozbawioną uroku pustynią betonowych domów, maksymalnie zajmujących właściwie każdą wolną przestrzeń, położoną przy wybrzeżu Zatoki Sarońskiej. Przy bliższym spotkaniu z grecką stolicą okazuje się, że każda dzielnica to osobna enklawa, rządząca się własnymi, wewnętrznymi prawami, rytmem dnia i zasadami życia. Goście przybywający do Aten po raz pierwszy mogą czuć się zakłopotani, zbici z tropu. Miasto ugina się pod ciężarem swego historyczno-kulturowego dziedzictwa, jakim częstowano i wciąż częstuje się Europę.


Tatoi stanowiło letnią rezydencję greckiej rodziny królewskiej oraz miejsce urodzenia Jerzego II Greckiego. W posiadłości znajduje się też cmentarz greckiej rodziny królewskiej. Po detronizacji ostatniego z monarchów, w 1973 roku, dobra Tatoi przejęło państwo, a wyrokiem Europejskiego Trybunału praw Człowieka, z 28 listopada 2002 r. Republika Grecka winna wypłacić rodzinie królewskiej odszkodowanie, w wysokości małego ułamka wartości, tych oraz także innych, odebranych królowi majątków, w Atenach i w innych miejscach Grecji.





GRECJA ZACHODNIA:

Grecja zachodnia to teren dziwny. Z jednej strony port Ioannina, z drugiej piękne, długie plaże zachodniego Peloponezu. Z


Olimpia- stanowisko archeologiczne (K I, II, III, IV, VI / 1989)
Olimpia, położona w dolinie Peloponezu, była zamieszkała od czasów prahistorycznych. W X w. stała się ośrodkiem kultu Zeusa. W gaju zwanym Altis- sanktuarium bogów- znajdowały się liczne arcydzieła antycznej Grecji. Oprócz świątyń, znajdują się tam również ruiny różnych urządzeń sportowych służącym igrzyskom olimpijskim, odbywającym się co cztery lata począwszy od r. 776 p.n.e.

Peloponez:
Mistra (K II, III, IV / 1989)

Mistra, “cud Morei", została wybudowana na planie amfiteatralnym, wokół twierdzy wzniesionej w 1249 r. przez księcia Achai, Wilhelma de Villehardouin. Miasto, zdobyte przez Bizancjum, a później okupowane przez Turków i Wenecjan, zostało całkowicie opuszczone w 1832 r. Pozostał jedynie imponujący zespół średniowiecznych ruin na tle malowniczego krajobrazu.


Archaeological site of Ancient Messene
Unesco tentative list


The archaeological site of ancient Messene lies in a fertile valley approximately in the centre of the Regional Unit of Messenia, south of Mt Ithome. Ithome was the strongest natural and manmade fortress of Messenia, controlling the valleys of Stenyclaros to the north and Makaria to the south. (Strabo compares it to Corinth as regards strategic importance). The first installation on the site dates to the Late Neolithic or the Early Bronze Age, while in the 9th-8th c. BC the cult of Zeus Ithomatas was established on the peak of Mt Ithome. A heroon shrine was founded in the lower city during the Geometric period (800-700 BC), along with the first sanctuary of Artemis Orthia, Asklepios and Messene. All the sacred buildings belonged to a town named Ithome. The Spartan annexation of the area following the First Messenian War (743-724 BC) put a stop to the evolution of the town into a more complex urban organism and the development of an urban outlook. The Spartan occupation, however, did not result in a total loss of national consciousness among the inhabitants, who were now helots. The city of Ancient Messene was founded in 369 BC by the Theban general Epaminondas (after the Battle of Leuctra in 371 BC, which resulted in Spartan defeat and the establishment of the Theban Hegemony). It became the capital of the free Messenian state following a long period (about four centuries) of occupation of the Messenian territory by the Spartans.


Stanowiska archeologiczne w Mykenach i Tirynsie (K I, II, III, IV, VI / 1999)

W Mykenach i Tirynsie pozostały imponujące ruiny dwóch największych miast cywilizacji mykeńskiej, panującej od XV do XII w. p.n.e. we wschodniej części basenu Morza Śródziemnego i która odegrała istotną rolę w rozwoju kultury Grecji klasycznej. Te dwa miasta są nierozerwalnie związane z Iliadą i Odyseją, dwiema epopejami homeryckimi, które od przeszło trzech tysiącleci wywierają ogromny wpływ na literaturę i sztukę.


Świątynia Apollina Epikuriosa w Bassai (K I, II, III / 1986)

Ta słynna świątynia boga Słońca i uzdrowiciela została zbudowana w połowie V w. p.n.e. na pustkowiu wyżynnej Arkadii. Budowla, w której znajduje się najstarszy zachowany kapitel koryncki, wyróżnia się śmiałością architektoniczną i łączy sztukę archaiczną z pogodnym stylem doryckim.

Stanowisko archeologiczne w Epidauros (K I, II, III, IV, VI / 1988)

W niewielkiej dolinie Peloponezu, Epidauros rozciąga się na kilku poziomach. W VI w. p.n.e. wprowadzono tam kult Asklepiosa, ale główne zabytki- przede wszystkim teatr, uważany za jedno z najczystszych arcydzieł architektury greckiej- pochodzą z IV w. Obszar sanktuarium, obejmujący świątynie i zabudowania szpitalne poświęcone bogom uzdrowicielom, stanowi cenne świadectwo kultów o charakterze terapeutycznym świata hellenistycznego i rzymskiego.



Wyspy sarońskie:

Według podziału geograficznego, wyspy sarońskie należą do Attyki. Jednakże wciąż są wyspamim i dotarcie tam wiąże się z przeprawą promową. Nie leżą one daleko od wybrzeży, jednakże... niebieski przestwór pomiędzy lądem stałym, a wyspami, powoduje konieczność zorientowania się w kursach promów lub rozpatrzeć ich zwiedzanie podczas rejsu. Wyspy Sarońskie są tak jakby "sypialnią Aten" - także są dobrze skomunikowane. Aczkolwiek pamiętajcie, że niemal każdy Grek posiada swoją łódkę. A turyści nie :)

Wyspy Sarońskie nie są tak spektakularne, jak inne greckie wyspy. Ale i tutaj znajdziemy perełki ukryte na nadmorskich skałach i w gajach oliwnych.

Warto zobaczyć:
Egina - Temple of Aphaia

Poros - Sanctuary of Poseidon

Spetses - Bouboulina museum (niewielkie muzeum regionalne)

The Museum was founded in 1991 by Mr. Philip Demertzis-Bouboulis, Bouboulina’s fourth generation descendant, in his effort to save the mansion from collapse. A non-profit making company manages all the Museum's income, and has as its main objective the repair and maintenance of the building and its use as a museum and cultural centre, whilst at the same time recounting the story of the Greek War of Independence with emphasis on the life of the heroine Laskarina Bouboulina. The museum is situated in the centre of Spetses town, directly behind Dapia Harbour.

Sporady:

Dwa archipelagi na Morzu Egejskim, znanych pod nazwą Sporady Południowe i Sporady Północne. Sporady północne administracyjnie należą do Tesalii, zaś południowe do Dodekanezu. Tutaj potraktujemy je w oderwaniu od lądu stałego, zaś południowe wrzucimy do Dodekanezu (ach to Rodos...)

Na Samos warto zobaczyć:
  • Tunel Eupalinosa - Muzeum oraz słynny podziemny akwedukt wybudowany w VI w. p.n.e. przez Eupalinosa.
  • Herajon na Samos - Ruiny wybudowanej w VIII wieku p.n.e. jońskiej świątyni, wzniesionej ku czci bogini Hery.
  • Jaskinia Pitagorasa



  • Kreta:

    Największa grecka wyspa. Zupełnie inna od pozostałej części Grecji.

    Minoan Palatial Centres (Knossos, Phaistos, Malia, Zakros, Kydonia)
    Unesco tentative list

    Crete, prominently and strategically located in the East Mediterranean Basin, formed the bridge between the peoples and cultures of three continents, Europe, Africa and Asia, and was the cradle of a splendid prehistoric civilisation in the land of Greece, the Minoan civilisation. The civilisation was named “Minoan” by Arthur Evans, the excavator of Knossos, which, according to myths preserved by ancient writers, was the seat of King Minos. The Minoan civilisation is connected to a great chapter in Greek mythology: the abduction of Europa by Zeus in the form of a bull, the ingenious Daedalus and his son Icarus, the Minotaur and the Labyrinth, the seven youths and seven maidens sent from Athens as tribute to Minos, the Athenian hero Theseus - who, with the assistance of Ariadne, rid his city of this blood-tax - the bronze giant Talus and the Argonauts, are all inextricably linked with the civilisation of Crete and its Pałaces, and have been a source of inspiration not only for ancient Greek culture but also for world art, music and literature. Crete, prominently and strategically located in the East Mediterranean Basin, formed the bridge between the peoples and cultures of three continents, Europe, Africa and Asia, and was the cradle of a splendid prehistoric civilisation in the land of Greece, the Minoan civilisation. The civilisation was named “Minoan” by Arthur Evans, the excavator of Knossos, which, according to myths preserved by ancient writers, was the seat of King Minos. The Minoan civilisation is connected to a great chapter in Greek mythology: the abduction of Europa by Zeus in the form of a bull, the ingenious Daedalus and his son Icarus, the Minotaur and the Labyrinth, the seven youths and seven maidens sent from Athens as tribute to Minos, the Athenian hero Theseus - who, with the assistance of Ariadne, rid his city of this blood-tax - the bronze giant Talus and the Argonauts, are all inextricably linked with the civilisation of Crete and its Pałaces, and have been a source of inspiration not only for ancient Greek culture but also for world art, music and literature.


    Gorge of Samaria National Park
    Unesco tentative list

    The Samaria Gorge is the acknowledged natural site and symbol of the island of Crete. It holds a unique and distinguished position in Cretan, Greek and Mediterranean history, as a place that has served throughout history as an ark for life and a haven of freedom. It is also identified with the unceasing production of the material and immaterial cultural heritage of Crete through the ages. The Lefka Ori (White Mountains), the largest and westernmost mountain range of Crete, dominate the southwest part of the island, covering almost 7% of the total surface of the fifth-largest island in the Mediterranean. More than 50 peaks of the impressive mountain range exceed 2,000 meters in altitude, while the highest, Pachnes, reaches a height of 2,453 meters above the Libyan Sea to the south and the Sea of Crete to the north of the island. The island of Crete is, justifiably, called a land of gorges, being cut by dozens, mainly running north to south. No other gorge, however, has the glamour and uniqueness of the Samaria Gorge. The Lefka Ori and the gorges that intersect them are a paradise for biodiversity and form a landscape of unique geological value and beauty. There, isolated from human presence, singular ecosystems have evolved, with dozens of endemic species and subspecies, providing shelter to the famous Cretan Agrimi Goat (Capra aegagrus cretica) and other rare species such as the Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), the Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), the Cretan Wildcat (Felis silvestris cretensis), Blasius’ Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus blasii), as well as the endemic plants Zelkova abelicea and Bupleurum kakiskalae. The Mediterranean Monk Seal (Monachus monachus) is found in the sea caves on the south coast of the National Park.

    Fortress of Spinalonga
    Unesco tentative list

    Spinalonga is a barren, arid rocky islet, with an area of 85,000 sq. m., lying in the mouth of the natural harbour of Elounda in Lasithi Prefecture, Crete. The islet was fortified in antiquity, to protect the ancient city of Olous. Towards the end of the 16th century, the Venetians, as part of their great fortification works to defend Crete, built on Spinalonga one of the most important bastion-type seaward fortresses of the Mediterranean, designed according to the bastion system of fortification by Genese Bressani and Latino Orsini. At strategic points in the fortifications are set the Michel and Moceniga or Barbariga demilunes, major works of fortification architecture. During the Cretan War (1645-1669), refugees sought shelter on the islet, as did rebels (“Chainides”) who used it as a base to harrass the Ottomans. Under the terms of the treaty for the surrender of Chandax (Heraklion) in 1669, Spinalonga remained a Venetian possession. In 1715, following a siege, the islet was surrendered to the Ottomans, the Venetian garrison left and the remaining 600 inhabitants were taken captive.

    From 1715 onwards, Spinalonga was settled by Muslims, who built their houses on the foundations of the Venetian buildings. The village flourished after the mid-19th century, until by 1881 it housed a population of 1,112 and was the largest Muslim commercial centre of Merabello Bay. The village houses were arranged in a stepped pattern across the west and south sides of the islet. At the end of the 19th century it is estimated that there were approximately 200 homes and 25 shops or workshops on Spinalonga. Today many well-built two-storey houses and shops remain; their morphology and symmetrical proportions are indicative of the principles of local and Balkan architectural tradition.

    In 1904, during the period of the Cretan State, Spinalonga was chosen as the site of a Leper Hospital. Sufferers who were sent to live on the island survived on State funding and charitable donations. Their hard, wretched life did not weaken their will to live. They organised their home, fell in love, married, had children. After the Leper Hospital was shut down in 1957, the islet remained deserted and uninhabited. In 1976 it was designated an archaeological site. Today it is an organised archaeological site with hundreds of thousands of visitors each year.

    Wyspy Jońskie:


    Archipelag na Morzu Jońskim rozciągnięty wzdłuż zachodnich wybrzeży Grecji i częściowo Albanii. W latach 1267-1386 należały do Królestwa Sycylii. W 1386 podbiła je Republika Wenecka. W 1797 włączone do Francji. W 1800 utworzono tu Republikę Siedmiu Wysp pod protektoratem rosyjsko-tureckim. W 1807 zwrócono wyspy Francji (od 1809 w składzie Prowincji Iliryjskich). W 1810 Wyspy Jońskie przejęła pod kontrolę Wielka Brytania. W 1815 Wyspy Jońskie stały się niepodległą republiką pod częściowym protektoratem Wielkiej Brytanii. W 1864 republikę włączono do Grecji.

    Stare Miasto Korfu (K IV/ 2007)

    Stare Miasto Korfu z zespołem bizantyjskich fortyfikacji, których początki sięgają VIII wieku p.n.e., położone nad samym brzegiem Adriatyku. Począwszy od XV wieku wyspa przechodziła kolejno we władanie Wenecji, Francji, Wielkiej Brytanii i Grecji. Wiele razy skutecznie broniła granic państwa weneckiego przed naporem armii osmańskiej. Twierdza Korfu to przykład doskonale obmyślanej budowli wojskowej, zaprojektowanej przez inżyniera architekta Sanmicheli’ego. Na oryginalny styl współczesnego Korfu składają się pozostałości starego weneckiego systemu budowli obronnych i nowych neoklasycystycznych budowli powstałych w XIX i XX wieku.


    Wyspy Egejskie Północne:

    Jeden z 13 regionów administracyjnych Grecji, rozłożony na wyspach północnej części Morza Egejskiego (na północ od Dodekanezu i Cyklad, bez Sporadów Północnych, Eubei, Thassos i Samotraki). Region graniczy z innymi jednostkami admistracyjnymi przez morze – od zachodu z regionem Grecja Środkowa i regionem Tesalia, od północy z regionem Macedonia Środkowa oraz regionem Macedonia Wschodnia i Tracja. Na południu znajduje się region Wyspy Egejskie Południowe zaś na wschodzie Turcja. Stolicą regionu jest miasto Mitylena na wyspie Lesbos.

    SAMOS:

    Pythagorion i Herajon na wyspie Samos (K II, III / 1992)
    Począwszy od III tysiąclecia p.n.e. na Samos, wysepce Morza Egejskiego położonej w pobliżu Azji Mniejszej, nastąpiło po sobie kilka kolejnych cywilizacji. Ich pozostałością są m.in. ruiny Pythagorionu, dawnego warownego miasta portowego z zabytkami greckimi i rzymskimi oraz wspaniały tunel- wodociąg, jak również Herajon, sanktuarium Hery z Samos.


    chios:

    Nea Moni na Chios
    [w:] Klasztory Dafni w Attyce, Osios Loukas w Beocji i Nea Moni na Chios (K I, IV / 1990)
    Trzy oddalone od siebie geograficznie klasztory- pierwszy w Attyce, koło Aten, drugi w Fokidzie, w okolicach Delf, a trzeci na jednej z wysp Morza Egejskiego, w pobliżu Azji Mniejszej- należą do tej samej serii typologicznej i posiadają podobne cechy estetyczne. Zbudowane są na planie centralnym i przekryte wielką kopułą wspartą na narożnych trompach, umożliwiających przejście do planu ośmiobocznego. W XI i XII w. zostały ozdobione wspaniałą dekoracją z marmuru oraz pięknymi mozaikami na złotym tle, charakterystycznymi dla “drugiego renesansu bizantyjskiego".

    ikaria:

    Ancient Towers of the Aegean Sea
    Unesco tentative list

  • Drakanou Tower, Ikaria


  • Lesvos:

    Skamieniały las sekwoi na Lesvos
    Unesco tentative list

    Located on the island of Lesvos (North Aegean Region), one of the most important natural heritage monuments in the world, the Skamieniały las sekwoi na Lesvos, is a unique testament to the ecosystem that once existed in the Aegean region during the Miocene Epoch. The forest consists of hundreds of fossilized trunks, standing or downed, coniferous or fruit-bearing, which are scattered over an area of 15,000 hectares in major concentrations within the protected region and at many other sites in the layers of volcanic rocks. To protect and promote the wonders of this ancient forest, the Greek state declared the area a Protected Natural Monument in 1985

    Late Medieval fortification in Mytilini
    [in:] Late Medieval Bastioned Fortifications in Greece
    Unesco tentative list

    With the appearance and establishment, in the 15th century, of the use of gunpowder, a new, powerful and destructive means of warfare, city fortification practices changed. Since medieval fortifications were unable to withstand the constantly increasing artillery power, additional defensive structures began to be added to existing fortresses. This change was completed in the 16th century, establishing the “bastion system” or “fronte bastionato”, based on the principle of “flanking fire”. In the 17th century, the need to confront even greater artillery firepower led to the construction of a multitude of smaller fortifications outside the main moat, whose aim was to keep the enemy as far away as possible from the main fortifications. Finally, up to the end of the 18th century, fortification architecture would continue to be based on the principles of the 16th century, while of course following the development of artillery. This development is documented by a series of fortifications on Greek territory. These fortifications are mostly found in areas that passed into Latin hands, such as the Peloponnese, the coasts of Western Greece, the Ionian Islands, Crete and the Dodecanese. Most were built on the site of older, ancient and/or Byzantine fortifications, but their main phase was constructed during the various phases of Latin domination. These are particularly well-preserved fortification works, which largely retain their integrity and original layout intact to the present day. This is very significant, given that they were built by the leading engineers of the time and closely follow developments in the field of defensive art. In recent years restoration projects for their protection and enhancement have taken place preserving however their particular character and their relation to the surrounding area. The fortifications also contribute to the study of the urban areas of which they form a part, providing valuable information on the organisation of urban planning, which they determined in several cases. The proposed fortifications are strategically positioned on the hubs of the trade routes between West and East and also North and South, and therefore played an important part as trading stations in the East Mediterranean basin.

    Z notatnika krajoznawcy


    źródło: Wikipedia

  • Cheimarros Tower, Naxos
  • Tower of Agios Petros, Andros
  • Tower of Agia Triada, Arkesini, Amorgos
  • White Tower, Siphnos
  • White Tower, Serifos
  • Tower of Agia Marina, Kea
  • Tower of Kastellorizo
  • Tower of Ro
  • Tower of Strongyli








  • Wyspy Egejskie Południowe:

    Dodekanez - ie (gr. Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, co znaczy „dwanaście wysp”) – archipelag na Morzu Egejskim i do końca 2010 roku prefektura (nomos) w regionie administracyjnym Wyspy Egejskie Południowe w Grecji ze stolicą w Rodos. Prefektura Dodekanez zajmowała łączną powierzchnię 2714 km2, zamieszkiwało ją około 200,5 tys. ludzi (stan z roku 2005). Powierzchnia wysp jest przeważnie górzysta. Panuje tu klimat śródziemnomorski z łagodnymi zimami i upalnymi, suchymi latami.

    Średniowieczne miasto Rodos (K II, IV, V / 1988)

    W latach 1309-1523 wyspę zajmowali joannici, którzy przekształcili ją w miasto warowne. Następnie wyspa przechodziła kolejno pod panowanie tureckie i włoskie. Górne Miasto, z Pałacem Wielkich Mistrzów, Szpitalem i Ulicą Kawalerów, stanowi jeden z najpiękniejszych gotyckich zespołów miejskich. W Dolnym Mieście znajdują się zarówno budowle gotyckie, jak i meczety, łaźnie publiczne oraz inne zabudowania z okresu ottomańskiego.


    Fortyfikacje na Rodos (miasto Rodos)
    [in:] Late Medieval Bastioned Fortifications in Greece - Unesco tentative list



    Zabytkowe centrum (Chora) z klasztorem Św. Jana Teologa oraz Jaskinią Apokalipsy na wyspie Patmos (K III, IV, VI / 1999)

    Wysepka Patmos w archipelagu Dodekanezu uznawana jest za miejsce, gdzie święty Jan Teolog napisał swą Ewangelię oraz Apokalipsę. W końcu X w. powstał tam klasztor poświęcony “ulubionemu uczniowi", który stał się odtąd miejscem pielgrzymek oraz nauczania greckiej religii prawosławnej. Ten wspaniały kompleks klasztorny góruje nad wyspą, a w przylegającym doń miasteczku Chora znajdują się liczne budowle sakralne i świeckie.





    Cyklady do końca 2010 roku były jedną z prefektur (nomosów) w regionie administracyjnym Wyspy Egejskie Południowe, ze stolicą w Ermupolis na wyspie Síros. W skład archipelagu wchodzi około 220 wysp i wysepek o łącznej powierzchni 2572 km2. Archipelag Cyklady składa się z wieńca wysp o zróżnicowanym krajobrazie, rozsianych między skalistymi szczytami i błękitnymi wodami Morza Egejskiego. Archipelag słynie z tarasowych miasteczek, niekończących się plaż, weneckich zamków i wiatraków.


    Delos (K II, III, IV, VI / 1990)

    Delos, maleńka wyspa archipelagu Cyklad, była miejscem narodzin Apollina. Jego sanktuarium przyciągało pielgrzymów z całej Grecji, a miasto było kwitnącym portem handlowym. Wyspa Delos stanowi unikalne świadectwo cywilizacji basenu Morza Egejskiego, następujących po sobie od III tysiąclecia p.n.e. po czasy wczesnochrześcijańskie. Rozległe stanowisko archeologiczne daje obraz wielkiego, kosmopolitycznego portu Morza Śródziemnego.

    Copyright © MUWIT.pl    O portalu |  autorzy |